Tents in Transition

I made my pilgrimage over to Big Maho Bay this week to take a closer look at the apparent dismantling of the Maho Bay tents.  The closer view made it possible to see that the furnishings still remain, but that the white “Stanley cloth” has been removed as well as the roofs. And, while it was mid-week, no one was working on those tents that day to further dismantle them. Everything about the new owner and the intent for the future of the land has been so secretive that I almost expect them to do any dismantling at night under the cover of darkness!

Snorkeler at Big Maho Bay beach, and in the background, the former Maho Bay Camp tents which appear to be in the process of being dismantled.
Snorkeler at Big Maho Bay beach, and in the background, the former Maho Bay Camp tents which appear to be in the process of being dismantled.

My hope is that the new owner is able to donate some of the materials for reuse by others on St. John. One place to donate building supplies is the newly established ReSource Depot here on St. John.  The wood floors inside many of the tents have some fantastic lumber than can be reused.

Looks like the former Maho Bay Camp tents are gradually being dismantled.
Looks like the former Maho Bay Camp tents are gradually being dismantled.

This was a beautiful day here on St. John with no Sahara dust clouding the skies, no hurricane in the forecast and no mosquitoes since we have not had the heavy rains that were here in June.  Big Maho was crowded with visitors as it is in the winter and from what I overheard, it may have been due to a wedding planned for the next day. I sat and read for a while and going in for a swim when the heat was too much. It is summertime on island which means the Maho tree on the beach is blooming, the sea grape is putting out its “grapes”, the laughing gulls are here and the sun sets a bit later (and along the north shore instead of the west end of Cruz Bay!)  Having such easy access to one of my favorite beaches on the island made staying at Maho Bay Camp perfect. I arrived late last summer when there are not as many visitors on island and altered working hours. For the month of September, before the rains arrived, I was able to walk down the Goat Trail after work and sit on the beach or go for a swim after work. I am so thankful for that time.

Big Maho Bay gets it's name from the Maho tree that lines the beach and blooms in the summer months.
Big Maho Bay gets it’s name from the Maho tree that lines the beach and blooms in the summer months.
Big Maho Bay beach and the USVI National Park Pavilion on a picture-perfect day in August.
Big Maho Bay beach and the USVI National Park Pavilion on a picture-perfect day in August.
Sea Grape plant on Big Maho Bay beach.
Sea Grape plant on Big Maho Bay beach.
A picturesque day in early August with a view from the east side of Big Maho Bay beach where it connects with the Goat Trail that went up to the former Maho Bay Camp.
A picturesque day in early August with a view from the east side of Big Maho Bay beach where it connects with the Goat Trail that went up to the former Maho Bay Camp.

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Tents in Transition”

  1. Thank you for sharing the beautiful pictures of Big Maho (and the less beautiful ones of the MBC naked tents!)

  2. I have the best memories of Maho, having first travelled there in 1998 with a friend and again as a month-long volunteer work camper in May 2002. Thanks for sharing these pictures and your story.

  3. Thank you for update. This is the saddest thing- really. I’m still really pissed that Trust for Public Land didn’t buy it or that we trusted them to buy it. In the end it was so affordable, a group of us could have bought it. Keep up with the updates.

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