Tag Archives: underwater life

Snorkeling at Waterlemon Cay

One of the best things about a visit to Maho Bay Camp was the chance to go snorkeling every day at a different bay and see the fish and coral at the different reefs. I will admit that over the years I have varied in my interest in snorkeling. Some years I would go every day and others I thought the water was too chilly and would venture underwater less often. This past year was a fantastic year for snorkeling due to the lack of rain. The more rain we have, the more runoff from the mountains hits the bay and clouds the water in the bays. I also finally decided to purchase a “real” underwater camera. (The disposable ones have always been a wast of time and money.) I bought a digital Panaxonic Lumix and could not be happier with it! And it has made my time snorkeling more fun too. I don’t get out snorkeling as much as I would like to.

I will be writing more about the reefs in future snorkeling posts, especially about the coral bleaching event that occurred some years back and what we can do to help the reefs survive the stress they are placed under due to environmental and human factors. But in the meantime, here are a few photos from a snorkel at Waterlemon Cay in mid-September of this year.

The view of Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay of the far left edge of the bay. The path took us along the right side edge of the island, past a beach and some ruins and the start of the Johnny Horn Trail.
The view of Leinster Bay and Waterlemon Cay of the far left edge of the bay. The path took us along the right side edge of the island, past a beach and some ruins and the start of the Johnny Horn Trail.
This is the path we took to hike past Leinster Bay out to Waterlemon Cay. This is as green as I have ever seen it!
This is the path we took to hike past Leinster Bay out to Waterlemon Cay. This is as green as I have ever seen it!
The lush green path out to Waterlemon Cay.  (I expected Frodo to jump out at any moment!)
The lush green path out to Waterlemon Cay. (I expected Frodo to jump out at any moment!)
I have been seeing more of the Scrawled Filefish around the reefs in St. John. They are distinguished by their beautiful blue marking and the fact that they will change color much like squid or octopus. Amazingly they feed on fire coral!
I have been seeing more of the Scrawled Filefish around the reefs in St. John. They are distinguished by their beautiful blue marking and the fact that they will change color much like squid or octopus. Amazingly they feed on fire coral!
The beautiful Peacock Flounder, with bright blue oval and spots on it body, is often seen blending into the ocean floor.
The beautiful Peacock Flounder, with bright blue oval and spots on it body, is often seen blending into the ocean floor.
The Southern Stingray is a common sight around the reefs in St. John. This one was stirring up the sand, but at the same time was being pestered by a group of fish that included the brown spotted Trunk Fish (on the right). I have never seen fish look like they were attacking a stingray before.  He began to puff up in the center. Not sure if he was eating or if it was a defensive posture he was taking.
The Southern Stingray is a common sight around the reefs in St. John. This one was stirring up the sand, but at the same time was being pestered by a group of fish that included the brown spotted Trunk Fish (on the right). I have never seen fish look like they were attacking a stingray before. He began to puff up in the center. Not sure if he was eating or if it was a defensive posture he was taking.
The Staghorn Coral at the bottom left is not often seen in the reefs around St. John and was the first coral species listed under the US Endangered Species Act.  Hopefully there are colonies doing better in less traveled bays.
The Staghorn Coral at the bottom left is not often seen in the reefs around St. John and was the first coral species listed under the US Endangered Species Act. Hopefully there are colonies doing better in less traveled bays.
Tarpon swimming in the deeper waters of the north side of Waterlemon Cay. Once I got used to their size (up to and over 4 feet) I have enjoyed swimming with them. If you are at Big Maho Bay when the pelicans are feeding you will see plenty of tarpon swimming in the shallow water among the silversides!
Tarpon swimming in the deeper waters of the north side of Waterlemon Cay. Once I got used to their size (up to and over 4 feet) I have enjoyed swimming with them. If you are at Big Maho Bay when the pelicans are feeding you will see plenty of tarpon swimming in the shallow water among the silversides!
A singular Feather Duster Worm amid the base of some Pillar Coral. The Pillar Coral is a hard coral but looks fuzzy because the tiny coral animals have their polyps out for feeding. It is one of the few hard corals that will do this during the daytime!
A singular Feather Duster Worm amid the base of some Pillar Coral. The Pillar Coral is a hard coral but looks fuzzy because the tiny coral animals have their polyps out for feeding. It is one of the few hard corals that will do this during the daytime!
A brilliantly colored purple Sea Fan at Waterlemon Cay, St. John. There is a large grouping of various colors that wave in the shallow water above the reef on the north side of the cay.
A brilliantly colored purple Sea Fan at Waterlemon Cay, St. John. There is a large grouping of various colors that wave in the shallow water above the reef on the north side of the cay.
I saw a lot of blue-spotted fish that day at Waterlemon Cay and cannot recall what fish this is!
I saw a lot of blue-spotted fish that day at Waterlemon Cay and cannot recall what fish this is!
These are called Social Feather Dusters because they group tightly together. They are actually worms and these feathery crowns often retract into tubes when a snorkeler approaches.
These are called Social Feather Dusters because they group tightly together. They are actually worms and these feathery crowns often retract into tubes when a snorkeler approaches.
Sea anemone spotted in 6 inches of water right at the edge of the bay where snorkelers enter to swim out to Waterlemon Cay! I believe it is called a Sponge Anemone.
Sea anemone spotted in 6 inches of water right at the edge of the bay where snorkelers enter to swim out to Waterlemon Cay! I believe it is called a Sponge Anemone.
The male Parrotfish are the colorful ones and it seems summertime is when the colors come out the most! The parrotfish eat algae off of coral and usually inadvertently ingest some of the hard skeleton of the coral, which later is expelled and becomes the soft white Caribbean sand we love so much! I believe this is the Stoplight Parrotfish.
The male Parrotfish are the colorful ones and it seems summertime is when the colors come out the most! The parrotfish eat algae off of coral and usually inadvertently ingest some of the hard skeleton of the coral, which later is expelled and becomes the soft white Caribbean sand we love so much! I believe this is the Stoplight Parrotfish.
Someone created a coral sculpture similar to those found on Drunk Bay on the edge of Leinster Bay, just as we turned off to head towards Waterlemon Cay. It reminds me of the traveling gnome!
Someone created a coral sculpture similar to those found on Drunk Bay on the edge of Leinster Bay, just as we turned off to head towards Waterlemon Cay. It reminds me of the traveling gnome!
We've had some good rain on St. John this summer and it has caused some interesting things to appear, namely this white fungus seen sprouting from a rotting tree. Looked like the color was spray painted on the fungus!
We’ve had some good rain on St. John this summer and it has caused some interesting things to appear, namely this white fungus seen sprouting from a rotting tree. Looked like the color was spray painted on the fungus!
My fellow snorkeler, Genia, ahead on the path leaving Waterlemon Cay. This island is all about the variations of the colors blue and green!
My fellow snorkeler, Genia, ahead on the path leaving Waterlemon Cay. This island is all about the variations of the colors blue and green!